Das Feel. Myers-Briggs Type Indicator®

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Das Feel baby If Hobbes had not written Leviafeel and Marx das Kapifeel and Mao the little red feel where would we be? Anyone would think there are only two genders #OnlyTwoGenders #GlastonburyHasLetItselfgo #ConquestofDough #DumberandDouma #EUssr #MeinFeel

 

 

 

 

 

 

Roger Lewis Introvert(41%) iNtuitive(56%) Thinking(7%) Judging(16%) I had not realised it was quite nuanced in its results Sara. It has given an interesting pause for a bit of introspection, a pleasant diversion for a wet Sunday afternoon.
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One of the common questions people ask after determining their type is: How frequent is my type? The table below shows estimates of the relative frequency of each of the sixteen types in the United States population.
estimated_frequency_table
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INTJ
Introverted iNtuitive Thinking Judging
To outsiders, INTJs may appear to project an aura of “definiteness”, of self-confidence. This self-confidence, sometimes mistaken for simple arrogance by the less decisive, is actually of a very specific rather than a general nature; its source lies in the specialized knowledge systems that most INTJs start building at an early age. When it comes to their own areas of expertise — and INTJs can have several — they will be able to tell you almost immediately whether or not they can help you, and if so, how. INTJs know what they know, and perhaps still more importantly, they know what they don’t know.
INTJs are perfectionists, with a seemingly endless capacity for improving upon anything that takes their interest. What prevents them from becoming chronically bogged down in this pursuit of perfection is the pragmatism so characteristic of the type: INTJs apply (often ruthlessly) the criterion “Does it work?” to everything from their own research efforts to the prevailing social norms. This in turn produces an unusual independence of mind, freeing the INTJ from the constraints of authority, convention, or sentiment for its own sake.
INTJs are known as the “Systems Builders” of the types, perhaps in part because they possess the unusual trait combination of imagination and reliability. Whatever system an INTJ happens to be working on is for them the equivalent of a moral cause to an INFJ; both perfectionism and disregard for authority may come into play, as INTJs can be unsparing of both themselves and the others on the project. Anyone considered to be “slacking,” including superiors, will lose their respect — and will generally be made aware of this; INTJs have also been known to take it upon themselves to implement critical decisions without consulting their supervisors or co-workers. On the other hand, they do tend to be scrupulous and even-handed about recognizing the individual contributions that have gone into a project, and have a gift for seizing opportunities which others might not even notice.
In the broadest terms, what INTJs “do” tends to be what they “know”. Typical INTJ career choices are in the sciences and engineering, but they can be found wherever a combination of intellect and incisiveness are required (e.g., law, some areas of academia). INTJs can rise to management positions when they are willing to invest time in marketing their abilities as well as enhancing them, and (whether for the sake of ambition or the desire for privacy) many also find it useful to learn to simulate some degree of surface conformism in order to mask their inherent unconventionality.
Personal relationships, particularly romantic ones, can be the INTJ’s Achilles heel. While they are capable of caring deeply for others (usually a select few), and are willing to spend a great deal of time and effort on a relationship, the knowledge and self-confidence that make them so successful in other areas can suddenly abandon or mislead them in interpersonal situations.
This happens in part because many INTJs do not readily grasp the social rituals; for instance, they tend to have little patience and less understanding of such things as small talk and flirtation (which most types consider half the fun of a relationship). To complicate matters, INTJs are usually extremely private people, and can often be naturally impassive as well, which makes them easy to misread and misunderstand. Perhaps the most fundamental problem, however, is that INTJs really want people to make sense. 🙂 This sometimes results in a peculiar naivete’, paralleling that of many Fs — only instead of expecting inexhaustible affection and empathy from a romantic relationship, the INTJ will expect inexhaustible reasonability and directness.
Probably the strongest INTJ assets in the interpersonal area are their intuitive abilities and their willingness to “work at” a relationship. Although as Ts they do not always have the kind of natural empathy that many Fs do, the Intuitive function can often act as a good substitute by synthesizing the probable meanings behind such things as tone of voice, turn of phrase, and facial expression. This ability can then be honed and directed by consistent, repeated efforts to understand and support those they care about, and those relationships which ultimately do become established with an INTJ tend to be characterized by their robustness, stability, and good communications.
(INTJ stands for Introvert, iNtuitive, Thinking, Judging and represents individual’s preferences in four dimensions characterising personality type, according to Jung’s and Briggs Myers’ theories of personality type.)
Personality test based on C. Jung and I. Briggs Myers type theory provides your type formula, type description, career choices
HUMANMETRICS.COM
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How Rare Is Your Personality Type?

By 

Personality Type Distribution
in the General Population

Type Frequency in Population
ISFJ               13.8%
ESFJ             12.3%
ISTJ             11.6%
ISFP          8.8%
ESTJ          8.7%
ESFP          8.5%
ENFP         8.1%
ISTP      5.4%
INFP     4.4%
ESTP     4.3%
INTP    3.3%
ENTP    3.2%
ENFJ    2.5%
INTJ   2.1%
ENTJ   1.8%
INFJ   1.5%

Data source: “MBTI Manual” published by CPP

 

For Types by Gender, click here

 

The rarest Personality Types are INFJ, followed by ENTJ and INTJ.

 

If your Type is rare, there are two ways to look at this:

1) Your Type is relatively rare and therefore your natural talents should be in great demand.

2) There are not many of you out there, so it may be hard to find people you can truly relate to.

 

If your Type is near the top of the chart:

1) There are a lot of people like you out there in the world. It should be easier to find people who think and behave the way you do.

2) You might find it easier to fit in than an INTJ, or INFJ would.

3) Diversity is healthy. Reach out and meet some of the more rare Types.

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Personality Type Explained

According to Carl G. Jung’s theory of psychological types [Jung, 1971], people can be characterized by their preference of general attitude:

 

Search Results for: thought prison pc

 

Catch Up Democracy! PC is indifferent to outcomes. ‘Outcomes’ are regarded as having no autonomous reality, but are merely seen as part of abstract theory.´´

 

Search Results for: procrustean

 

Further Thoughts on Market Measures as Procrustean Delusions. Watching the watchers, Deniers denying denial doing as denial does? CLimate Catastrophe Porn! Not safe for snowflakes. #OccupyTheEuropeanSpring

Regarding the GBP being a potential Canary in the Coal Mine Tim. http://letthemconfectsweeterlies.blogspot.se/2017/10/inside-new-economic-science-of.html  Energy Metrics EROI etc should be defined and used consistently across all analysis. GDP, Currency Exchange Rates, Un-Employment Figures, Deficit and Debt FIgures, Productivity FIgures, Market Forecasts/Indexes. All of these measures have suffered from the Neo-Liberal Curse of Procrustian Massage by Machete

 

Globalism Decoded, Usury Hells Fuel, Bourgoise Resolution #ConquestofDough

Notes on an Old Fiddle. (For Johanna, I Love You.)

Notes on an Old Fiddle.
I wrote a Note, about the key, you needed the information so you could meet me at the pitch on time.
This was not the first wrong Note, it will not be the last, I did not know you didn’t read perhaps I should have told you instead.
it’s something about our communication, What is missing from our relationship, why do we not hear each other.
Perhaps we can solve this equation, seek some resolution why must I march when you are dancing.
Your Tangos sound like Dirges for me.
I might have seemed sharp to you, that joke I told fell flat in the wrong company. The symphony you sought was beyond the scope of the Duet I had planned.
If I were to Score that goal again, perhaps I would not repeat the same notes so often. Variations on a broken theme? Perhaps a fresh Page needs to be turned.
Your melody always haunts me as I hum that tune you used to sing in carefree moments and when you put the children to bed.
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Jeremy Hunt’s father, Admiral of the Fleet, cousin, private healthcare boss – G30, Global Capitalism’s Executive Committee: Giants: The Global Power Elite – Revelation 13 Mark of the Beast? Swedish city of Lund ’embraces’ human microchipping

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Wonderful as usual Tony. Why are you not running the bbc, THE WORLD WOULD BE A BETTER PLACE IF YOU WERE.
We can but dream.

 

https://twitter.com/PMotels/status/1145205437287030784

https://twitter.com/PMotels/status/1145205291522416640

BCfm Politics Show

Friday 28th June 2019

At six –discussing the big stories in Bristol, Britain and around the world
After seven –straight talking and investigative reports

BCfm’s weekly Politics Show presented by Tony Gosling with Irish Republican Labour activist Martin Summers

February 2019 Ofcom complaint result:UKLFI exposed as creation of Israeli foreign ministryBristol Post article: BCfm cleared after being reported to Ofcom for anti-semitic conspiracy theories

Listen live http://www.bcfmradio.com/player or http://stream.bcfmradio.com:7017/live.mp3

BCfm audio files usually available 1hr, Radio4All 3-4hrs, after TX
Any probs mp3s should be on alternative links below by then

First hour news review: Brexit Party – their ideas and possible policies;  poll saying 40 Labour seats could be lost to Brexit Party;  is Brexit deliverable? Boris’s blunders and mistakes – the Skripal affair;

Dr David Halpin, former surgeon, discusses Jeremy Hunt’s record as Health Secretary (2012-2018) and Hunt’s family connections with…

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Stuck in the middle. @JoeBlob20 @MrTardigradeUK @_Spinflight_ @financialeyes @2013Boodicca @Albion_Rover @SteveBakerHW @Steven_Woolfe

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John, the level of denial is palpable in the public face of the ego-driven narrative merchants. The Public face of the Establishment,
The easy way to see who they regard as the Fourth Estate is to look at the risibly absurdist comedy gem that is Credder.

https://twitter.com/PMotels/status/1144859456167120896

https://twitter.com/PMotels/status/1143433839966076928

https://wikitacticalvoting.miraheze.org/wiki/Main_Page
Prisons as Frameworks:

“The prisons are the frameworks. And those who do not like prisons will be opposed to the myth of the framework. They will welcome a discussion with a partner who comes from another world, from another framework, for it gives them an opportunity to discover their so far unfelt chains, to break these chains, and thus to transcend themselves. But this breaking of one’s prison is clearly not a matter of routine: it can only be the result of a critical effort and of a creative effort.”

In some ways, learning a new language is like expanding the horizons of our current prison, not simply because it forces us to experience new ways of seeing the world, but rather because it forces us to reexamine our own.
https://web.archive.org/web/20150522065726/http://leakygrammar.net:80/2012/07/15/karl-popper-breaking-out-of-the-prison-of-language/

 

The Slog.

metoday If we care to raise our eyes for a minute from a choice between sociopaths and the destructive determination of Remainers, it is becoming increasingly obvious that the abject failure of wealth to trickle down is hurtling towards a push v shove moment. The comfortable may vote Tory and the desperate Labour in the hope that this can be avoided, but it cannot. The squeezed middle may yet, in time, usher in an era of practical pragmatism as an alternative to ideology. But don’t hold your breath.

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A litre of diesel in England costs £1.32, or thereabouts. In France, the price has crept up again to €1.48. The tolls driving from Calais to Aquitaine cost me a whopping €107, and the fuel €95. For the French in general (beyond the metropolitan citadans and bobos) this kind of tax-driven inflation isn’t funny: more than any other factor, it explains…

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INTERNATIONAL STUDENT INITIATIVE FOR PLURALISM IN ECONOMICS

The Brain Is Full of Maps. A Talk By Freeman Dyson

Freeman Dyson
Freeman Dyson
Physicist

FREEMAN DYSON, now retired, has spent most of his life as a professor of physics at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, taking time off to advise the US government and write books for the general public. He was born in England and worked as a civilian scientist for the Royal Air Force during World War II. He came to Cornell University as a graduate student in 1947 and worked with Hans Bethe and Richard Feynman, producing a user-friendly way to calculate the behavior of atoms and radiation. He also worked on nuclear reactors, solid-state physics, ferromagnetism, astrophysics, and biology, looking for problems where elegant mathematics could be usefully applied.

Dyson’s books include Disturbing the Universe (1979), Weapons and Hope (1984), Infinite in All Directions (1988), Origins of Life (1986, second edition 1999), The Sun, the Genome and the Internet (1999), The Scientist as Rebel (2006, published by New York Review Books), A Many-Colored Glass: Reflections on the Place of Life in the Universe (2010), and Dreams of Earth and Sky (2015). He is a fellow of the American Physical Society, a member of the National Academy of Sciences, and a fellow of the Royal Society of London. In 2000 he was awarded the Templeton Prize for Progress in Religion.

 

The Brain Is Full of Maps

[6.11.19]

CONVERSATIONS AT EDGE

 

 I was talking about maps and feelings, and whether the brain is analog or digital. I’ll give you a little bit of what I wrote:

Brains use maps to process information. Information from the retina goes to several areas of the brain where the picture seen by the eye is converted into maps of various kinds. Information from sensory nerves in the skin goes to areas where the information is converted into maps of the body. The brain is full of maps. And a big part of the activity is transferring information from one map to another.

As we know from our own use of maps, mapping from one picture to another can be done either by digital or by analog processing. Because digital cameras are now cheap and film cameras are old fashioned and rapidly becoming obsolete, many people assume that the process of mapping in the brain must be digital. But the brain has been evolving over millions of years and does not follow our ephemeral fashions. A map is in its essence an analog device, using a picture to represent another picture. The imaging in the brain must be done by direct comparison of pictures rather than by translations of pictures into digital form.

FREEMAN DYSON, emeritus professor of physics at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, has worked on nuclear reactors, solid-state physics, ferromagnetism, astrophysics, and biology, looking for problems where elegant mathematics could be usefully applied. His books include Disturbing the UniverseWeapons and HopeInfinite in All Directions, and Maker of PatternsFreeman Dyson’s Edge Bio Page

https://www.edge.org/conversation/freeman_dyson-the-brain-is-full-of-maps

Randomness. CHARLES SEIFE

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https://www.edge.org/q2011/q11_3.html#taleb

CHARLES SEIFE
Professor of Journalism, New York University; formerly journalist, Science magazine; Author, Proofiness

Randomness

Our very brains revolt at the idea of randomness. We have evolved as a species to become exquisite pattern-finders — long before the advent of science, we figured out that a salmon-colored sky heralds a dangerous storm, or that a baby’s flushed face likely means a difficult night ahead. Our minds automatically try to place data in a framework that allows us to make sense of our observations and use them to understand events and predict them.

Randomness is so difficult to grasp because it works against our pattern-finding instincts. It tells us that sometimes there is no pattern to be found. As a result, randomness is fundamental limit to our intuition; it says that there are processes that we can’t predict fully. It’s a concept that we have a hard time accepting even though it is an essential part of the way the cosmos works. Without an understanding of randomness, we are stuck in a perfectly predictable universe that simply doesn’t exist outside of our own heads.

I would argue that only once we understand three dicta — three laws of randomness — can we break out of our primitive insistence on predictability and appreciate the universe for what it is rather than what we want it to be.

The First Law of Randomness: There is such a thing as randomness.

We use all kinds of mechanisms to avoid confronting randomness. We talk about karma, in a cosmic equalization that ties seemingly unconnected events together. We believe in runs of luck, both good and ill, and that bad things happen in threes. We argue that we are influenced by the stars, by the phases of the moon, and by the motion of the planets in the heavens. When we get cancer, we automatically assume that something — or someone — is to blame.

But many events are not fully predictable or explicable. Disasters happen randomly, to good people as well as to bad ones, to star-crossed individuals as well as those who have a favorable planetary alignment. Sometimes you can make a good guess about the future, but randomness can confound even the most solid predictions — don’t be surprised when you’re outlived by the overweight, cigar-smoking, speed-fiend motorcyclist down the block.

What’s more, random events can mimic non-random ones. Even the most sophisticated scientists can have difficulty telling the difference between a real effect and a random fluke. Randomness can make placebos seem like miracle cures, harmless compounds appear to be deadly poisons, and can even create subatomic particles out of nothing.

The Second Law of Randomness: Some events are impossible to predict.

If you walk into a Las Vegas casino and observe the crowd gathered around the craps table, you’ll probably see someone who thinks he’s on a lucky streak. Because he’s won several rolls in a row, his brain tells him that he’s going to keep winning, so he keeps gambling. You’ll probably also see someone who’s been losing. The loser’s brain, like the winner’s, tells him to keep gambling. Since he’s been losing for so long, he thinks he’s due for a stroke of luck; he won’t walk away from the table for fear of missing out.

Contrary to what our brains are telling us, there’s no mystical force that imbues a winner with a streak of luck, nor is there a cosmic sense of justice that ensures that a loser’s luck will turn around. The universe doesn’t care one whit whether you’ve been winning or losing; each roll of the dice is just like every other.

No matter how much effort you put into observing how the dice have been behaving or how meticulously you have been watching for people who seem to have luck on their side, you get absolutely no information about what the next roll of a fair die will be. The outcome of a die roll is entirely independent of its history. And, as a result, any scheme to gain some sort of advantage by observing the table will be doomed to fail. Events like these — independent, purely random events — defy any attempts to find a pattern because there is none to be found.

Randomness provides an absolute block against human ingenuity; it means that our logic, our science, our capacity for reason can only penetrate so far in predicting the behavior of cosmos. Whatever methods you try, whatever theory you create, whatever logic you use to predict the next roll of a fair die, there’s always a 5/6 chance you are wrong. Always.

The Third Law of Randomness: Random events behave predictably in aggregate even if they’re not predictable individually

Randomness is daunting; it sets limits where even the most sophisticated theories can not go, shielding elements of nature from even our most determined inquiries. Nevertheless, to say that something is random is not equivalent to saying that we can’t understand it. Far from it.

Randomness follows its own set of rules — rules that make the behavior of a random process understandable and predictable.

These rules state that even though a single random event might be completely unpredictable, a collection of independent random events is extremely predictable — and the larger the number of events, the more predictable they become. The law of large numbers is a mathematical theorem that dictates that repeated, independent random events converge with pinpoint accuracy upon a predictable average behavior. Another powerful mathematical tool, the central limit theorem, tells you exactly how far off that average a given collection of events is likely to be. With these tools, no matter how chaotic, how strange a random behavior might be in the short run, we can turn that behavior into stable, accurate predictions in the long run.

The rules of randomness are so powerful that they have given physics some of its most sacrosanct and immutable laws. Though the atoms in a box full of gas are moving at random, their collective behavior is described by a simple set of deterministic equations. Even the laws of thermodynamics derive their power from the predictability of large numbers of random events; they are indisputable only because the rules of randomness are so absolute.

Paradoxically, the unpredictable behavior of random events has given us the predictions that we are most confident in.

tagtalkphil2011

KARL POPPER: BREAKING OUT OF THE PRISON OF LANGUAGE July 15, 2012 · by Gavin

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https://web.archive.org/web/20150522065726/http://leakygrammar.net:80/2012/07/15/karl-popper-breaking-out-of-the-prison-of-language/

KARL POPPER: BREAKING OUT OF THE PRISON OF LANGUAGE

Having just written about Wittgenstein, I thought following up with a short post on the philosopher Karl Popper would be apt.  Wittgenstein and Popper are an interesting duo, both very different kinds of planets orbiting around the sun of philosophical thought.  On an evening in October of 1946, Popper, Wittgensten as well as other philosophers (including Bertrand Russel) had a gathering of the Cambridge Moral Science Club held at King’s College.

Popper was to present on the topic, “Are There Philosophical Problems?”
And for about ten minutes, a battle of philosophical perspectives raged in that small room. In their book, ‘Wittgenstein’s Poker,’ which attempts to uncover what exactly happened that night, Edmonds and Eidinow write,

“What is clear is that there were vehement exchanges between Popper and Wittgenstein over the fundamental nature of philosophy – whether there were indeed philosophical problems (Popper) or merely puzzles (Wittgenstein).”

Why was Wittgenstein so angry?  And why did he seemingly threaten Popper with a red-hot fire poker? Only debated recollections remain from that evening, but what we do know is that probably two of the greatest philosophers of that time both came to that meeting thinking that they were protecting philosophy from the errors of its past, and Popper saw Wittgenstein as “philosophy’s ultimate enemy.”

In Popper’s memoir he writes that Wittgenstein “had been nervously playing with the poker” using it like a “conductor’s baton to emphasize his assertions.”  At one point the question of Popper’s view on ethics came up, and “Wittgenstein challenged Popper to give an example of a moral rule.”  Popper writes, “I replied: ‘Not to threaten visiting lecturers with pokers.’  On saying this, Wittgenstein threw down the red-hot poker in a rage and stormed out of the room.

It’s an interesting little event in the history of bizarre encounters in academia, where those who hold there ideas so dear let the emotional conviction of their ideas run rampant in their debates.

Feeling that I needed to know a little more about Popper, him having a similar background to Wittgenstein (both having lived in Vienna during the famous Vienna circle, both coming from wealthy families, and both having escaped Vienna during World War II because of their Jewish heritage) I read his essay, “The Myth of the Framework.”

popper

I am posting it here, because he said some interesting things about language and the implications of learning another language.

Popper begins by quoting Plato,

“Those who believe this, and those who do not, have no common ground of discussion, but in view of their opinions they must of necessity scorn each other.”

When I read this quote, I couldn’t help but think he had the brief ten-minute raging philosophical duel with Wittgenstein somewhere in the back of his mind when he wrote this essay.

The essay is worth a read, but a nice overview of its main points with some insightful commentary can be found here.  My main interest in bringing it up here is that in order to argue his point, that discussions with people from different perspectives is the only way to make progress, he brings up Whorf‘s notion of linguistic relativity, linguistic relativity being the idea that language influences or perhaps even structures the way we see the world.  And people with different languages therefore see the world in a different way.

There is a passage that Popper writes on this I thought worth quoting in full, because it gives an interesting perspective that sees language as having the power to shape reality as well as the power of learning a new language to break out of old frameworks.

The metaphor of language and prison:

“Whorf himself, and some of his followers, have suggested that we live in a kind of intellectual prison, a prison formed by the structural rules of our language.  I am prepared to accept this metaphor, though I have to add to it that it is an odd prison as we are normally unaware of being imprisoned.  We may become aware of it through culture clash. But then, this very awareness allows us to break the prison. If we try hard enough, we can transcend our prison by studying the new language and by comparing it with our own.”

Widening the prison:

“Admittedly, the result will be a new prison.  But it will be a much larger and wider prison.  And again, we will not suffer from it.  Or rather, whenever we do suffer from it, we are free to examine it critically, and thus to break out again into a still wider prison.”

Prisons as Frameworks:

“The prisons are the frameworks.  And those who do not like prisons will be opposed to the myth of the framework.  They will welcome a discussion with a partner who comes from another world, from another framework, for it gives them an opportunity to discover their so far unfelt chains, to break these chains, and thus to transcend themselves.  But this breaking of one’s prison is clearly not a matter of routine: it can only be the result of a critical effort and of a creative effort.”

In some ways, learning a new language is like expanding the horizons of our current prison, not simply because it forces us to experience new ways of seeing the world, but rather because it forces us to reexamine our own.

ABOUT

“Were a language ever completely “grammatical” it would be a perfect engine of conceptual expression. Unfortunately, or luckily, no language is tyrannically consistent. All grammars leak“.

–Edward Sapir, Language (1921), p. 38

surfing east-side oahu

4 responses to “about”

  1. Hello Gavin,
    I just finished attending a conference in Grenoble, France http://epal-grenoble.net and met a French colleague/PhD student & researcher who loves your blog, which I recently discovered. Looks fascinating!!!
    Aloha from a graduate of the MA program in SLS at UHM (moi 🙂

  2. Hi Merica, thanks for the link, looks like an interesting conference! Glad to know there are people out there who enjoy reading my blog! especially SLS grads! 🙂 Mahalo nui loa for the comment:-)

  3. Hey Gavin!
    I have a couple of questions for you but I don’t see a way to contact you on this blog, so I’m just leaving a comment…could you send me a message to my blog’s e-mail [@ gmail] when you get a chance?

    Mahalo 🙂
    -Allison

    PIDGIN AND THE LEGACY OF SUGAR IN HAWAI‘I

    “When the infernal machine of plantation slavery began to grind its wheels, iron laws of economics came into play, laws that would lead to immeasurable suffering but would also, and equally inevitably, produce new languages all over the world – languages that ironically, in the very midst of man’s inhumanity to man, demonstrated the essential unity of humanity.”

    – Derek Bickerton

    https://youtu.be/pdZuOfqkuLg

 

Signs Symbols Stories Language. Winston/Chomsky. ( MIT) Understanding in our minds and what we express through communication in language

Signs Symbols Stories Language. Winston/Chomsky. ( MIT) Understanding in our minds and what we express through communication in language are not systems designed to complement each other. This leads to confusions and the disjoint can be manipulated against our own best interests. I have been pondering lately whether in Sweden a country that uses a language with 41,000 words; (approx.) http://reference.yourdictionary.com/o… One way to get an estimate of the number of words in the Swedish language is to look at a dictionary. The online Woxikon dictionary lists over 41,000 Swedish words. It is interesting to note that more words started with “s” than any other, by far, and the least number of words started with “q” and “x.” This is only a rough estimate of the number of words in the Swedish language. http://oxforddictionaries.com/words/h… The Second Edition of the 20-volume Oxford English Dictionary contains full entries for 171,476 words in current use and 47,156 obsolete words. To this may be added around 9,500derivative words included as subentries. Over half of these words are nouns, about a quarter adjectives, and about seventh verbs; the rest is made up of exclamations, conjunctions, prepositions, suffixes, etc. And these figures don’t take account of entries with senses for different word classes (such as noun and adjective). I do wonder if with fewer words Swedes have more common stories and communicate their shared understanding at a more sub-conscious level than the attempts at precision, English speaking nations make inevitably ending in a wider opportunity for misunderstanding the points being made by the other person? The above notions arise from my watching a film celebrating MIT’s Artificial Intelligence department and two themes developed by Professors Chomsky and Winston on the apparatus used for Language and the idea of Story Telling in communication and learning being the reawakening of Latent understanding. Are we bound more by our shared stories than by our Understanding of being? I would say yes, of course, we are we understand very little but actually share a common conditioned understanding of our stories. Politicians call them narratives, Ad men ‘keep on message’. Meme’s, Buzz words, Soundbites the unquestioned Facts of life communicated in Language often against our instinctive better natures. Reference these quotes at the links here.

letthemconfectsweeterlies.blogspot.se/2013_04_01_archive.html

 

Philosophy is a battle against the bewitchment of our intelligence by means of language. Intuition and concepts constitute… the elements of all our knowledge, so that neither concepts without an intuition in some way corresponding to them, nor intuition without concepts, can yield knowledge. The oldest, shortest words – ‘yes’ and ‘no’ – are those which require the most thought. We have two ears and one mouth so that we can listen twice as much as we speak. In words are seen the state of mind and character and disposition of the speaker. The aim of art is to represent not the outward appearance of things, but their inward significance. The metaphor of language and prison: “Whorf himself, and some of his followers, have suggested that we live in a kind of intellectual prison, a prison formed by the structural rules of our language. I am prepared to accept this metaphor, though I have to add to it that it is an odd prison as we are normally unaware of being imprisoned. We may become aware of it through culture clash. But then, this very awareness allows us to break the prison. If we try hard enough, we can transcend our prison by studying the new language and by comparing it with our own.” Widening the prison: “Admittedly, the result will be a new prison. But it will be a much larger and wider prison. And again, we will not suffer from it. Or rather, whenever we do suffer from it, we are free to examine it critically, and thus to break out again into a still wider prison.” Prisons as Frameworks: “The prisons are the frameworks. And those who do not like prisons will be opposed to the myth of the framework. They will welcome a discussion with a partner who comes from another world, from another framework, for it gives them an opportunity to discover their so far unfelt chains, to break these chains, and thus to transcend themselves. But this breaking of one’s prison is clearly not a matter of routine: it can only be the result of a critical effort and of a creative effort.” http://leakygrammar.net/2012/07/15/ka… I quote others only in order the better to express myself. Lastly get emotionally connected to your story so you can deliver it, you know, if you can’t deliver the emotions to your script there’s no point to your story. Story is the key. 0 up, 0 down Robert Redford quotes

 

 

Signs Symbols Stories Language. Winston/Chomsky.( MIT)

Signs Symbols Stories Language.
Winston/Chomsky.( MIT)
Understanding in our minds and what we express through communication in language are not systems designed to compliment each other . This leads to confusions and the disjoint can be manipulated against our own best interests.
I have been pondering lately whether in Sweden a country that uses a language with 41,000 words; (approx.)
 
One way to get an estimate of the number of words in the Swedish language is to look at a dictionary. The online Woxikon dictionary lists over 41,000 Swedish words. It is interesting to note that more words started with “s” than any other, by far, and the least number of words started with “q” and “x.” This is only a rough estimate of the number of words in the Swedish language.
 
 
 
The Second Edition of the 20-volume  Oxford English Dictionary contains full entries for 171,476 words in current use, and 47,156 obsolete words. To this may be added around 9,500derivative words included as subentries. Over half of these words are nouns, about a quarter adjectives, and about a seventh verbs; the rest is made up of exclamations, conjunctions, prepositions, suffixes, etc. And these figures don’t take account of entries with senses for different word classes (such as noun and adjective).

I have been pondering lately whether in Sweden, a country that uses a language with 41,000 words, will access to  less words give Swedes more common stories and communicate their shared understanding at a more sub-concious level and more acurately. For instance allowing greater precision than admitted in English speaking nations, where inevitably there is a wider opportunity for misunderstanding  the other persons point of view, either expressed or assumed?

 
The above notions arise from my watching a film celebrating MIT’s Artificial Intelligence department and two themes developed by Professors Chomsky and Winston on the apparatus used for Language and the idea of Story Telling in communication and learning being the re awakening of Latent understanding.







Are we bound more by our shared stories than by our Understanding of being. I would say yes of course we are we understand very little but actually share a common conditioned understanding of our stories. Politicians call them narratives, Ad men ‘keep on message’. Meme’s, Buzz words, Soundbites the unquestioned Facts of life communicated in Language often against our instinctive better natures.

Philosophy is a battle against the bewitchment of our intelligence by means of language.

Intuition and concepts constitute… the elements of all our knowledge, so that neither concepts without an intuition in some way corresponding to them, nor intuition without concepts, can yield knowledge.

The oldest, shortest words – ‘yes’ and ‘no’ – are those which require the most thought.

We have two ears and one mouth so that we can listen twice as much as we speak.

In words are seen the state of mind and character and disposition of the speaker.

The aim of art is to represent not the outward appearance of things, but their inward significance.

The metaphor of language and prison:
“Whorf himself, and some of his followers, have suggested that we live in a kind of intellectual prison, a prison formed by the structural rules of our language.  I am prepared to accept this metaphor, though I have to add to it that it is an odd prison as we are normally unaware of being imprisoned.  We may become aware of it through culture clash. But then, this very awareness allows us to break the prison. If we try hard enough, we can transcend our prison by studying the new language and by comparing it with our own.”
Widening the prison:
“Admittedly, the result will be a new prison.  But it will be a much larger and wider prison.  And again, we will not suffer from it.  Or rather, whenever we do suffer from it, we are free to examine it critically, and thus to break out again into a still wider prison.”
Prisons as Frameworks:
“The prisons are the frameworks.  And those who do not like prisons will be opposed to the myth of the framework.  They will welcome a discussion with a partner who comes from another world, from another framework, for it gives them an opportunity to discover their so far unfelt chains, to break these chains, and thus to transcend themselves.  But this breaking of one’s prison is clearly not a matter of routine: it can only be the result of a critical effort and of a creative effort.”

http://leakygrammar.net/2012/07/15/karl-popper-breaking-out-of-the-prison-of-language/
https://web.archive.org/web/20130202092402/http://leakygrammar.net/2012/07/15/karl-popper-breaking-out-of-the-prison-of-language/

 Robert Redford quotes  
(function(){(function r(e) { function t(e) { if (e.parentNode) if (e.childNodes.length > 1) { for (var t = document.createDocumentFragment(); e.childNodes.length > 0; ) t.appendChild(e.childNodes[0]); e.parentNode.replaceChild(t, e); } else e.firstChild ? e.parentNode.replaceChild(e.firstChild, e) : e.parentNode.removeChild(e); } function n(e) { if (e) try { for (var n = e.querySelectorAll(“.gr_”), r = n.length, o = 0; o < r; o++) t(n[o]); } catch (i) {} } function r(e) { try { Object.defineProperty(e, “innerHTML”, { get: function() { try { var t = e.ownerDocument.createRange(); t.selectNodeContents(e); var r = t.cloneContents(), o = document.createElement(“div”); return o.appendChild(r), n(o), o.innerHTML; } catch (i) { return “”; } }, set: function(t) { try { var n = e.ownerDocument.createRange(); n.selectNodeContents(e), n.deleteContents(); var r = n.createContextualFragment(t); e.appendChild(r); } catch (o) {} } }); } catch (t) {} } if (e) { var o = e.cloneNode; e.cloneNode = function(t) { var i = o.call(e, t); if (e.classList.contains(“mceContentBody”)) i.innerHTML = e.innerHTML, n(i); else try { r(i); } catch (a) {} return i; }, r(e); } })(document.querySelector(“[data-gramm_id=’eda30252-deb9-8e89-01c1-c07d15dfbabc’]”)) })()

#ObjectiveKhunts, Grub Street, From here to there Indexing Social Media onwards to Web 3 #OIP #Alexandria #GrubStreet

Selection_890

tagtalkphil2011.jpg

The rules of randomness are so powerful that they have given physics some of its most sacrosanct and immutable laws. Though the atoms in a box full of gas are moving at random, their collective behavior is described by a simple set of deterministic equations. Even the laws of thermodynamics derive their power from the predictability of large numbers of random events; they are indisputable only because the rules of randomness are so absolute. Paradoxically, the unpredictable behavior of random events has given us the predictions that we are most confident in. http://www.edge.org/q2011/q11_3.html#…
created at TagCrowd.com

 

Published on 4 Nov 2012

DONATE TUBES
http://www.wolframalpha.com/input/?i=… I have been using the Wolfram Alpha computational knowledge search engine for 18 months or so. Stephen Wolframs ted talk makes some interesting points on Linguistics and Mathematics. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=60P771… It is worth watching, is information Knowledge? does the interrogation field actually provide the context which turns the information into Knowledge or at least a knowledge claim. There is an interesting Facebook app that allows you to analyse your Facebook Network, I played with it for 30 minutes this morning. http://youtu.be/oRNML2sPa1o ( still uploading) Which reminds me of the quote.( I don’t kniow why?) ´´Never believe anything until it is officialy denied´´.Otto Von Bismark.

 

So Good I named it twice different labels. ( Cod Psycology point Red Green Blue?)

The rules of randomness are so powerful that they have given physics some of its most sacrosanct and immutable laws. Though the atoms in a box full of gas are moving at random, their collective behavior is described by a simple set of deterministic equations. Even the laws of thermodynamics derive their power from the predictability of large numbers of random events; they are indisputable only because the rules of randomness are so absolute. Paradoxically, the unpredictable behavior of random events has given us the predictions that we are most confident in. http://www.edge.org/q2011/q11_3.html#…

created at TagCrowd.com

Corpus Linguistics Semantiiprocity Ranjan and Roger Chat #ObjectiveKhunts #GrubStreet #ConquestofDough #ThereareOnlyTwoGenders #OligarchicalCollectivism

download (1)

1

 

 

Corpus Linguistics Semantiiprocity Ranjan and Roger Chat #ObjectiveKhunts #GrubStreet #ConquestofDough #ThereareOnlyTwoGenders #OligarchicalCollectivism

download (1)

Selection_891.jpg

created at TagCrowd.com

ON LANGUAGE, OPPRESSION AND POLITICAL CORRECTNESS. THE BAARDS OF WALES. IMRE KALANYOS, ARANY JÁNOS, SUJATA BHATT

https://longhairedmusings.wordpress.com/2017/05/09/on-language-oppression-and-political-correctness-the-baards-of-wales-imre-kalanyos-arany-janossujata-bhatt/
Who do you think you are kidding Dr North If you think we’re on the Run. #Technocracy #OligarchicalCollectivism
https://longhairedmusings.wordpress.com/2019/06/26/who-do-you-think-you-are-kidding-dr-north-if-you-think-were-on-the-run-technocracy-oligarchicalcollectivism/

Bench notes Objective Khunts. Grub Street Censorship and war, war on cash proof of brain solutions. #OIP #MINDS #Steemit #Bitchute #Bittorrents #ETH
https://longhairedmusings.wordpress.com/2019/06/28/bench-notes-objective-khunts-grub-street-censorship-and-war-war-on-cash-proof-of-brain-solutions-oip-minds-steemit-bitchute-bittorrents-eth/

https://dominiccummings.com/2019/06/26/on-the-referendum-33-high-performance-government-cognitive-technologies-michael-nielsen-bret-victor-seeing-rooms/

Tesla is the British Leyland of the 21st Century

Adam Curtis

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Trap_(TV_series)
Century of Self

Lost World of the ’70s

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prosody_%28linguistics%29

https://www.mpib-berlin.mpg.de/en/staff/gerd-gigerenzer

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gerd_Gigerenzer

Corpus Linguistics Semantiiprocity?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semanticity

Listening to Brexit

Brexit — Remain v Leave, PR on Twitter
Go to the profile of John Swain
John Swain
May 23, 2016
In a previous article we looked at the Twitter conversation about Brexit during the week ending 21 May.

Here is a map of the overall conversation with two accounts highlighted.

1_yerJzEcHUnaI_zr41Sp-mg.jpeg

1_kr1YPq3OeFs5j6K51Mu1vQ.jpeg1_9bZNPRHoFkLinyc4LjHP-Q.jpeg

Candida Tobin

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Candida Tobin Hon FTCL, LTCL[clarification needed] (5 January 1926 – 14 December 2008) was the author of the Tobin Method, a music education system for teaching music theory and practice to students of all ages and abilities.

Personal life[edit]

Tobin was born Doreen E. Pugh in ChingfordEssex on 5 January 1926 and grew up there with elder sisters Phyllis and Barbara. Tobin was married twice, firstly to Derrick Llewelyn Mason (1924-1989) in 1949, and divorced soon after without any issue. She subsequently married John M. Tobin in 1960, and had two children, Penelope A. & David Richard Tobin.

Tobin died at her UK home in SawbridgeworthHertfordshire on 14 December 2008, aged 82, of cancer.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ “Notice of Candida Tobin’s death”. Archived from the original on 30 December 2008. Retrieved 19 December 2008.

External links[edit]

1

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