Evolution Of Muso Musings to Rogers LongHairedBlog. #ObjectiveKhunt #GrubStreet #LetThemConfectSweeterLies.

People congregate at the entrance to a narrow street, overlooked by two four-storey buildings. Each floor of the right-most building projects further over the street than the floor below. At the corner of each building, shops advertise their wares. A cart is visible down the street, and one man appears to be carrying a large leg of meat.

19th-century Grub Street (latterly Milton Street), as pictured in Chambers Book of Days

Until the early 19th century, Grub Street was a street close to London‘s impoverished Moorfields district that ran from Fore Street east of St Giles-without-Cripplegate north to Chiswell Street. Famous for its concentration of impoverished “hack writers“, aspiring poets, and low-end publishers and booksellers, Grub Street existed on the margins of London’s journalistic and literary scene. It was pierced along its length with narrow entrances to alleys and courts, many of which retained the names of early signboards. Its bohemian society was set amidst the impoverished neighbourhood’s low-rent dosshouses, brothels and coffeehouses.

According to Samuel Johnson‘s Dictionary, the term was “originally the name of a street… much inhabited by writers of small histories, dictionaries, and temporary poems, whence any mean production is called grubstreet”. Johnson himself had lived and worked on Grub Street early in his career. The contemporary image of Grub Street was popularised by Alexander Pope in his Dunciad.

The street was later renamed Milton Street, which was partly swallowed up by the Barbican Estate development, but still survives in part. The street name no longer exists, but Grub Street has since become a pejorative term for impoverished hack writers and writings of low literary value.

 

Blogging the new Grub Street. This from Wikipedia, “Taste is like philosophy. It belongs to a very small number of privileged souls … It is unknown in bourgeois families, where one is constantly occupied with the care of one’s fortune”. In the words of Darnton, Voltaire “thought that the Enlightenment should begin with the grands”.[52] The historian cites similar opinions from d’Alembert and Louis Sébastien Mercier.[53] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Illuminism

Muso Musings: Fatherhood, Theory & Stuff “T’is hard the kinds of Knowledge are but two, The One erroneous, the Other true. The former profits nothing when ’tis gain’d, The other’s difficult to be attain’d.” Abu Jaaphar Ebn Tophail’s INTRODUCTION To the LIFE of Hai Ebn Yokdhan.

´´The question now afloat in the world respecting THINGS AS THEY ARE is the most interesting that can be presented to the human mind´´

As Godwin notes in an introduction to Caleb Williams, and so I continue to Regarder Les tableaux
in Du Champs Grey Space.

 

 

blog 2011 first post.jpg

MUSO MUSINGS : Fatherhood, Theory & Stuff

Muso Musings: Fatherhood, Theory & Stuff “T’is hard the kinds of Knowledge are but two, The One erroneous, the Other true. The former profits nothing when ’tis gain’d, The other’s difficult to be attain’d.” Abu Jaaphar Ebn Tophail’s INTRODUCTION To the LIFE of Hai Ebn Yokdhan.

 

 

 

Selection_986

2011

https://web.archive.org/web/20180710060414/http://letthemconfectsweeterlies.blogspot.com/2011/04/

blog 2012 julyWorkspace 1_985.jpg

https://web.archive.org/web/20180710062636/http://letthemconfectsweeterlies.blogspot.com/2012/07/

2013

https://web.archive.org/web/20180710061748/http://letthemconfectsweeterlies.blogspot.com/2013/07/

Blogging the new Grub Street. This from Wikipedia, “Taste is like philosophy. It belongs to a very small number of privileged souls … It is unknown in bourgeois families, where one is constantly occupied with the care of one’s fortune”. In the words of Darnton, Voltaire “thought that the Enlightenment should begin with the grands”.[52] The historian cites similar opinions from d’Alembert and Louis Sébastien Mercier.[53] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Illuminism

2013 voltaire.jpg

2014.jpg

https://web.archive.org/web/20180710061451/http://letthemconfectsweeterlies.blogspot.com/2014/07/

Proudhon Governement

Pierre-Joseph Proudhon

“To be GOVERNED is to be watched, inspected, spied upon, directed, law-driven, numbered, regulated, enrolled, indoctrinated, preached at, controlled, checked, estimated, valued, censured, commanded, by creatures who have neither the right nor the wisdom nor the virtue to do so. To be GOVERNED is to be at every operation, at every transaction noted, registered, counted, taxed, stamped, measured, numbered, assessed, licensed, authorized, admonished, prevented, forbidden, reformed, corrected, punished. It is, under pretext of public utility, and in the name of the general interest, to be place under contribution, drilled, fleeced, exploited, monopolized, extorted from, squeezed, hoaxed, robbed; then, at the slightest resistance, the first word of complaint, to be repressed, fined, vilified, harassed, hunted down, abused, clubbed, disarmed, bound, choked, imprisoned, judged, condemned, shot, deported, sacrificed, sold, betrayed; and to crown all, mocked, ridiculed, derided, outraged, dishonored. That is government; that is its justice; that is its morality.”
General Idea of the Revolution in the Nineteenth Century, translated by John Beverly Robinson (London: Freedom Press, 1923), pp. 293-294.”

― Pierre-Joseph Proudhon

May 2017 Blog.jpg

 

Postcards from a journey to the unknown.

I started writing this blog when I realised that I was locked into a series of events which I would be subject to the results of, but over which I would neither be consulted or considered. The realisation was actually quite comforting but I knew I needed an outlet for my inevitable struggles with self reproachment and regret and guilt and all of the other feelings I knew would come either from within or provoked from without. This Blog represented a purchase mentally for my ticket for the ride, a journey I was determined to understand, enjoy and share some postcards with myself and others who might be interested having realised they too may be taking the same train.As with all postcards, some are written a little more thoughtfully, others are scribbles just checking in or marking out places to revisit and spend some more time all of them represent though a snapshot of the view from that point in space and time.

Anyhow grab your interrail card, and climb aboard the index of the blog lists titles these are the most read pages.

All Time

THIS IS AN EXPERIMENTAL NONSENSES MEANINGLESS YET…
10 May 2011, 1 comment
7034 Views
My use of Wikipedia since February 20th
10 May 2011
1286  Views
Econosophy and other musings – Post a Comment
4 Dec 2011
1182  Views
Have Banks Killed their Golden Goose
9 Jun 2011
1112  Views
Positive Money Forum • View topic – Mortgages – Gr…
8 Jun 2011


This Week

A friend of Michael Sanden. Internet Documentary S…
21 Sep 2014, 1 comment
44 Views
Rain Song Performance
21 Sep 2014
11  Views
MUSO MUSINGS On Fatherhood Theory and STuff: The R…
24 Jun 2011
9  Views
My use of Wikipedia since February 20th
10 May 2011
7  Views
Guitar as Therapy. Mine saves me from the greedy B…
15 Apr 2011
5  Views

All Posts.
Pageviews today
21 views
Pageviews yesterday
72  views
Pageviews last month
1,253 Views
Pageviews all time history
34,997  Views

I am very pleased to have this scrapbook of postcards home from the journey into what for me has turned out to be a nirvana of self-realisation and becoming. It is very humbling to feel that I have made some progress in my own estimation to ´´Being´´ as opposed to merely having. ( to paraphrase Paulo Freire).

▼  July (7)

 

 

 

 

https://web.archive.org/web/20170620030702/http://letthemconfectsweeterlies.blogspot.com/

 

ON THE ADVANTAGE AND DISADVANTAGE OF HISTORY FOR LIFE. 100,000 Blog Visits. Friedrich Nietzsche: 1844-1900

This Blog, which has been therapeutic in many ways, has now reached 100,000 page views.
What is it about Large Round Numbers. One looks out now towards 1,000,000.

 

Selection_993.jpg

 

Old Blog on IPFS

IPFS Old Blog

This is a Clipboard of notes , Objective Khunt Column   And Grub Street Journal Coming Soon.

 

Grub Street Twitter.jpg

 

https://twitter.com/search?q=%23GrubStreetJournal&src=typd

Robert Darnton’s The Literary Underground of the Old Regime was the first major historical work to critique this ideal model. [96] He argues that, by the mid-18th century, the established men of letters (gens de lettres) had fused with the elites (les grands) of French society. Consider the definition of “Goût” (taste) as written by Voltaire in the Dictionnaire philosophique (taken from Darnton): “Taste is like philosophy. It belongs to a very small number of privileged souls … It is unknown in bourgeois families, where one is constantly occupied with the care of one’s fortune”. In the words of Darnton, Voltaire “thought that the Enlightenment should begin with the grands“. [97] The historian cites similar opinions from d’Alembert and Louis Sébastien Mercier . [98]

The Republic of Letters was the sum of a number of Enlightenment ideals: an egalitarian realm governed by knowledge that could act across political boundaries and rival state power.[165] It was a forum that supported “free public examination of questions regarding religion or legislation”.[166] Immanuel Kant considered written communication essential to his conception of the public sphere; once everyone was a part of the “reading public”, then society could be said to be enlightened.[167] The people who participated in the Republic of Letters, such as Diderot and Voltaire, are frequently known today as important Enlightenment figures. Indeed, the men who wrote Diderot’s Encyclopédie arguably formed a microcosm of the larger “republic”.[168]

Front page of The Gentleman’s Magazine, January 1731

Many women played an essential part in the French Enlightenment, due to the role they played as salonnières in Parisian salons, as the contrast to the male philosophes. The salon was the principal social institution of the republic[169] and “became the civil working spaces of the project of Enlightenment”. Women, as salonnières, were “the legitimate governors of [the] potentially unruly discourse” that took place within.[170] While women were marginalized in the public culture of the Old Regime, the French Revolution destroyed the old cultural and economic restraints of patronage and corporatism (guilds), opening French society to female participation, particularly in the literary sphere.[171]

In France, the established men of letters (gens de lettres) had fused with the elites (les grands) of French society by the mid-18th century. This led to the creation of an oppositional literary sphere, Grub Street, the domain of a “multitude of versifiers and would-be authors”.[172] These men came to London to become authors, only to discover that the literary market simply could not support large numbers of writers, who in any case were very poorly remunerated by the publishing-bookselling guilds.[173]

The writers of Grub Street, the Grub Street Hacks, were left feeling bitter about the relative success of the men of letters[174] and found an outlet for their literature which was typified by the libelle. Written mostly in the form of pamphlets, the libelles “slandered the court, the Church, the aristocracy, the academies, the salons, everything elevated and respectable, including the monarchy itself”.[175] Le Gazetier cuirassé by Charles Théveneau de Morande was a prototype of the genre. It was Grub Street literature that was most read by the public during the Enlightenment.[176] According to Darnton, more importantly the Grub Street hacks inherited the “revolutionary spirit” once displayed by the philosophes and paved the way for the French Revolution by desacralizing figures of political, moral and religious authority in France.[177]

However, the prime example of reference works that systematized scientific knowledge in the age of Enlightenment were universal encyclopedias rather than technical dictionaries. It was the goal of universal encyclopedias to record all human knowledge in a comprehensive reference work.[201] The most well-known of these works is Denis Diderot and Jean le Rond d’Alembert‘s Encyclopédie, ou dictionnaire raisonné des sciences, des arts et des métiers. The work, which began publication in 1751, was composed of thirty-five volumes and over 71 000 separate entries. A great number of the entries were dedicated to describing the sciences and crafts in detail and provided intellectuals across Europe with a high-quality survey of human knowledge. In d’Alembert’s Preliminary Discourse to the Encyclopedia of Diderot, the work’s goal to record the extent of human knowledge in the arts and sciences is outlined:

As an Encyclopédie, it is to set forth as well as possible the order and connection of the parts of human knowledge. As a Reasoned Dictionary of the Sciences, Arts, and Trades, it is to contain the general principles that form the basis of each science and each art, liberal or mechanical, and the most essential facts that make up the body and substance of each.[202]

The massive work was arranged according to a “tree of knowledge”. The tree reflected the marked division between the arts and sciences, which was largely a result of the rise of empiricism. Both areas of knowledge were united by philosophy, or the trunk of the tree of knowledge. The Enlightenment’s desacrilization of religion was pronounced in the tree’s design, particularly where theology accounted for a peripheral branch, with black magic as a close neighbour.[203] As the Encyclopédie gained popularity, it was published in quarto and octavo editions after 1777. The quarto and octavo editions were much less expensive than previous editions, making the Encyclopédie more accessible to the non-elite. Robert Darnton estimates that there were approximately 25 000 copies of the Encyclopédie in circulation throughout France and Europe before the French Revolution.[204] The extensive, yet affordable encyclopedia came to represent the transmission of Enlightenment and scientific education to an expanding audience.[205]

Grub Street

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to navigationJump to search

People congregate at the entrance to a narrow street, overlooked by two four-storey buildings. Each floor of the right-most building projects further over the street than the floor below. At the corner of each building, shops advertise their wares. A cart is visible down the street, and one man appears to be carrying a large leg of meat.

19th-century Grub Street (latterly Milton Street), as pictured in Chambers Book of Days

Until the early 19th century, Grub Street was a street close to London‘s impoverished Moorfields district that ran from Fore Street east of St Giles-without-Cripplegate north to Chiswell Street. Famous for its concentration of impoverished “hack writers“, aspiring poets, and low-end publishers and booksellers, Grub Street existed on the margins of London’s journalistic and literary scene. It was pierced along its length with narrow entrances to alleys and courts, many of which retained the names of early signboards. Its bohemian society was set amidst the impoverished neighbourhood’s low-rent dosshouses, brothels and coffeehouses.

According to Samuel Johnson‘s Dictionary, the term was “originally the name of a street… much inhabited by writers of small histories, dictionaries, and temporary poems, whence any mean production is called grubstreet”. Johnson himself had lived and worked on Grub Street early in his career. The contemporary image of Grub Street was popularised by Alexander Pope in his Dunciad.

The street was later renamed Milton Street, which was partly swallowed up by the Barbican Estate development, but still survives in part. The street name no longer exists, but Grub Street has since become a pejorative term for impoverished hack writers and writings of low literary value.

 

Advertisements

20 thoughts on “Evolution Of Muso Musings to Rogers LongHairedBlog. #ObjectiveKhunt #GrubStreet #LetThemConfectSweeterLies.

  1. Profile picture
    RogerGLewis
    @PMotels
    34 minutes ago, 7 tweets, 3 min read Read on Twitter

    web.archive.org/web/2016012821… via @internetarchive I started taking my Blog mopre seriously in Jan 2016, with a Post on The Iron Law of Oligarchy.
    The Iron Law of Oligarchy.
    I posted a comment at Truth Dig which I decided to write as a Blog post as well just to bring together some of my Reading on Elites and Oligarchy. Chris Hedges article is here. Comment by (Soicilai…
    https://longhairedmusings.wordpress.com/2016/01/06/the-iron-law-of-oligarchy/
    Tragedy and Hope, From whence we came!
    Tragedy and Hope, From whence we came!I am currently reading Tragedy and Hope Carroll Quigleys Opus on Political Economic History since for ever. Its an exhilarating read but very war and peace it …
    https://longhairedmusings.wordpress.com/2016/01/14/tragedy-and-hope-from-whence-we-came/
    Globalisation Un-Entangled. (A FOUND POEM, CIPHER OF GLOBALISM )
    Cut-up technique[edit] Cut-up technique is an extension of collage to words themselves, Tristan Tzara describes this in the Dada Manifesto:[49] TO MAKE A DADAIST POEM Take a newspaper. Take some sc…
    https://longhairedmusings.wordpress.com/2017/03/28/globalisation-un-entangled-a-found-poem-cipher-of-globalism/
    Exerpt from The Conquest of Dough. by Roger G Lewis
    — 0046702273052 skype: rogerglewis Skype telephone number +46406931188 Portfolio of on line Profiles( Go on be Nosy ) CLICK HERE PLEASE #ConquestofDough
    https://longhairedmusings.wordpress.com/2016/11/24/exerpt-from-the-conquest-of-dough-by-roger-g-lewis/
    The Conquest Of Dough ( Novel) Multimedia Web Site – The Conquest Of Dough
    The Conquest Of Dough ( Novel) Multimedia Web Site
    A web site and Blog informing the Context of the new Novel Conquest Of Dough By Roger G Lewis
    https://theconquestofdough.weebly.com/

    mentions

    Like

  2. The Scriblerian club most consistently comprised Jonathan Swift, John Gay, John Arbuthnot, Robert Harley, and Thomas Parnell. The group met during the spring and summer of 1714. One group project was to write a satire of contemporary abuses in learning of all sorts, in which the authors would combine their efforts to write the biography of the group’s fictional founder, Martin Scriblerus, through whose writings they would accomplish their satirical aims. The resulting The Memoirs of Martin Scriblerus contained a number of parodies of the most lavish mistakes in scholarship.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s